How to make play dough – the recipe.

Play dough is so much fun and so easy to make.  Today I will talk about play dough and give you an easy recipe.

Lots of people ask is play dough appropriate to play with is it a waste of food?   The answer is Yes play dough is play dough and that’s what it is made for allowing children to create and learn from it.   And no it is not a waste of food.   It is up to individuals to use play dough or not.  I myself do not find it culturally insensitive.

So let’s look at how to make an easy play dough recipe.

multi colours

(Photo by Magda Ehlers from Pexels)

Play dough recipe.

Ingredients

2 cups flour

1 cup of salt

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 cups of cold water

2 tablespoons oil

extra flour

extras you can add separately:  rosemary leaves, lavender, lemon finely grated, vanilla essence, food colouring

Method

In a bowl add water from the tap, oil and vinegar mix.

Add salt and mix thoroughly.

Gradually add flour and extras if needed.

Mix then turn onto a floured surface.

Knead for five minutes.  The dough is now ready to use.

I used to use the recipe with cream of tartar but it was not always available so I found that this recipe worked fine.  I always make a new dough when required.  I throw out the play dough at the end of the day.  This is because by the end of the day it is been well used and is dirty.  Play dough can be stored in the fridge after making it if you want to use the next day.

The learning outcomes of play dough.

  • develops fine motor skills
  • develops language skills
  • develops sharing and turn taking skills.
  • develops hand eye co ordination
  • develops social skills
  • develops colour recognition
  • develops imagination
  • develops maths skills
  • develops senses

 

 

Dancing with scarves.

Today I want to talk about  dancing with scarves with children.  Dancing with scarves is enjoyed by all age groups.  It is an easy activity that incorporates music and movement with scarves,

The music that you choose can vary I like to put on classical music or you can sing E rere taku poi, which helps children to develop the words in te reo Māori.

What will children typically do when they hear music?  It depends some will stand there and just listen, others may jump around and others will tap a foot or jiggle their hips each child is unique when they start learning to dance.  Put a scarf in their hand and add music and watch their little faces glow.

Dance is very valuable to add into your program with children every day.   This is such a cool activity.  Give each child a scarf.  Stand alongside the children and start waving the scarves around in time to the music.

Here are the words to E rere taku poi for you to practice.

poiE rere taku poi, E rere taku poi, ki runga, ki runga

E rere taku poi, E rere taku poi Ki raro ki raro

E rere runga,  E rere  raro

E rere roto,  e rere waho

E rere taku poi, e rere taku poi

Ki runga ki runga

 

Rere-flying

ki runga-up high

ki raro – down low

ki roto-inwards

ki waho- outwards

Dancing with scarves has many good learning outcomes which include:

  • developing skills for use of poi
  • developing fine motor skills- tiny fingers have to learn to grasp the scarf
  • developing movement skills learning to move to music
  • developing hearing one of the senses
  • developing the touch sense
  • creating their own moves and actions with the scarves
  • spatial awareness is developing
  • having fun with others
  • sharing scarves thus developing social skills
  • developing imagination

I always found it hard to find decent scarves but came across some great ones perfect for little fingers right here.

JZK 20 Multi colour soft organza silk square dance juggling scarves for children kids girls party activities accessory decoration rhythm band scarf baby sensory scarfs

Click onto scarves to see where to get them from.

Have a great day and get dancing!

Tania

Using a hīnaki – eel trap.

What are the learning outcomes of using  a hinaki?

Today I will look at a hīnaki or eel trap as a Māori resource for teaching.  We can ask the children and ourselves these questions?

hiinaki

  1. What is the purpose of a hīnaki?  To catch eels for our whanau to eat.
  2. Who can use this? Anybody who wants to catch an eel and has the knowledge of how to use the hīnaki.  You must be strong enough to lift an eel.  And as it is by water I would recommend an adult.
  3. What would be the learning outcomes of taking the children down to the creek to use the hīnaki and go eeling?  
  • fun
  • exercise
  • social skills
  • mathematics
  • developing memory
  • engaging in real life activity
  • learning about sustainability
  • engaging with others-social skills
  • sharing -manaakitanga
  • listening skills developing
  • learning a new life skill

hiinaki

So there is a never ending list of learning outcomes for the children and adults by using this one resource of the hīnaki – eel trap.  Then you can go back into the classroom and retell the story of what you did, draw pictures of the eeling adventure, talk about what the children learnt etc. You could spend a whole week of learning on this one resource.  Maybe get someone in that knows how to make a hīnaki in to help the children make one for your centre.

Here is a pdf link to some interesting facts about long fin eels.  http://www.longfineel.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Tuna-Kuwharuwharu-Longfin-Eel.pdf

I hope that you find this useful.  Any photos or stories you may like to share with others share below in comments.

Kia pai to ra

Enjoy your day.