Ko mahana ahau. I am warm.

Ko mahana ahau means I am warm.  It is getting rather cold and I am thinking that the children in your care have a few runny noses now and feeling a bit unwell.  Well here today I have some great ideas on how to keep warm and stay healthy.

Exercise.

An early morning run around is the quickest and easiest way to warm up.  Ask the children “Who can run to the fence and back?”  Soon you will have a bunch of children running to the fence and back.  Other games you can play to warm up are:

  • Tag
  • Hopscotch
  • Skipping
  • Jumping jacks or star jumps
  • Dancing
  • Jumping
  • an Obstacle course

Healthy eating.

Children will need lots food to stay warm during the winter and I have a few suggestions on what you could prepare with the children or give recipes to families.

healthy eating
Warm muffins

Healthy snacks:

  • Vegetable soup, tomato soup, chicken soup. noodle soup with croutons
  • Cheese on toast, cheese toasted sandwiches
  • Pasta
  • Pizza
  • Warm muffins
  • Mince pie
  • Boiled eggs
  • Spaghetti bolognaise
  • Sweetcorn fritters
  • Mussel chowder
  • Fired bread or takakau – Maori bread
  • Hot chips and fish
  • Hot dogs
  • Macaroni Cheese
  • Meat Stew
  • Hot Chocolate with marshmallows
  • Apple pie or any fruit pie with a splash cream
  • Ask children what they like to eat to keep warm

Eating healthy and lots exercise is the key to keeping warm this winter.  What suggestions do you have to share please leave in comments section.

 

 

What is Matariki?

 

What is Matariki?  In late May early June a group of stars can be seen rising up in the sky.  The name of this group of stars is Matariki.  It is the Māori name for the Pleaides star cluster.   Mata o te Ariki or the eyes of God.  It is the beginning of the Māori new year.  It is also known as the seven sisters.

Pleaides is the Greek name.

Subaru  meaning gathered together is the Japanese word for Matariki.

Makali’i meaning eyes of loyalty is the Hawaiian word for Matariki.

Here is a utube link to watch a short story on Matariki. 

Matariki is a time for harvesting kumara and other vegetables in the garden.  You can also plant out seeds or seedlings into the garden too.  Check your maramataka to see which days are best.

Photo by Shlomo Shalev on Unsplash

There is a great resource provided by the Christchurch library that all teachers can check out here.

These are the children of Ranginui the sky:

Whetū                              star

Kapua                                cloud

Ua                                          rain

Rā                                              sun

Āniwaniwa                        rainbow

Marama                             moon

Whetū marama               planet

Māngōroa                        The milky way

Māhutonga      Southern Cross

Kōpu                                 morning star

Meremere Tūahiahi   Evening star

Matariki    Pleaides

Unenuku  God of the rainbow

Tāwhirimtea    God of the wind

Rūaumoko        God of Earthquakes volcanoes

Here are some great books you can get that children will love and learn about Matariki.

Seven Kites of Matariki

Little Kiwi's Matariki

Matariki The Maori New Year

 

 

 

 

Ngā rā o te wiki – the days of the week.

Māori of old had  figured out their own time scale which was sufficient for their needs.  Minutes or seconds were not known but the Māori had names for the day and night midnight and dawn. The time at night was known by the stars positions and through the day by the position of the sun.

Monday            Rāhina            Mane

Tuesday           Rātū                Tūrei

Wednesday    Rāapa            Wenerei

Thursday         Rāpare           Taite

Friday                 Rāmere         Paraire

Saturday          Rāhoroi           Hatarei

Sunday             Rātapu             Rātapu

The second list of words in Māori are transliteration.

“Transliteration is the process of transferring a word from the alphabet of one language to another. Transliteration helps people pronounce words and names in foreign languages. … It changes the letters from the word’s original alphabet to similar-sounding letters in a different one”  www.vocabulary.com

Rā is day.

Rāhina is the day of the moon.

Rātu is day of Mars. (Tūmatauenga)

Rāapa is day of Mercury. (Apārangi)

Rāpare is day of Jupiter. (Pareārau)

Rāmere day of Venus.

Rāhoroi is wash day.

Rātapu is holy day.

World Environment day,

Tena Koe welcome to this blog about World Environment Day.  This day is celebrated on the 5th June 2020 and I would like to talk a bit about what this day is and what you and the children can do to engage on this day.

Photo: Mt Maunganui NZ

World Environment Day.  What is it about you may ask?  It is about being aware of the world around us and learning about ways in which we can awhi (help)the world.  Give some Manaakitanga to our world.  There are many things we can do to help the world and reducing what we buy is one of them.

Recycling things,  Reusing things in our environment instead of throwing them into the earth.  We need to be composting our kitchen scraps and growing gardens.

Photo: My Moko in the garden.

This year the theme is biodiversity.  Biodiversity means biological diversity and it includes the diversity and life of water and land life in the world.  You could do lots of activities with children around this theme and include families and their ideas too.

Some ideas for World  Environment Day.

  • Plant a native tree.
  • Plant a Native bush.
  • Start a recycle area in your classroom or home.
  • Start a compost bin or pile in the garden.
  • Plant vegetables and flowers.
  • Make a bug hotel.
  • Make bird feeders for the garden.
  • Make up a song about biodiversity to share.
  • Engage in community plantings.
  • Do some art ir a wall display to represent the environment and biodiversity.

A Māori whakatauki.

POIPOIA TE KAKANO KIA PUAWAI

NURTURE THE SEED AND IT WILL BLOSSOM.

 

Any further ideas or tell us what you have done please leave a comment below.

 

Manaakitanga.

Manaakitanga what does this mean and what does it look like for children.  Mannakitanga is a Māori value that is deeply entwined in the Māori culture.  It is about looking after people and enhancing their mana/wellbeing.  It is about looking after your visitors and being a good host.  It is about sharing and caring for others in your community.

Manaakitanga in the classroom is similar.   Children can show manaakitanga by:

  • Showing respect to each other.
  • Sharing resources with others.
  • Encouraging others in their mahi and helping them to finish their work.
  • Helping others if they see they need a hand with something.
  • Developing friendships by being kind to each other.
  • Sharing food and drink together.
  • Talking with each other nicely and clearly.
  • Showing empathy towards others.  Sharing a hug.
  • Understanding others feelings.
  • Encouraging manaakitanga.
  • Caring for the environment.
  • To nurture and love.

Children will learn by watching you the teacher so ensure that you are doing these things too.  Teach Whānau/families about manaakitanga too.

Maybe make a wall display so Whānau can read and see what manaakitanga is.  Take photos of manaakitanga e.g. sharing kai(food), playing and smiling together etc.  Put children;s artwork on the display too.  Ask Whānau to contribute to the display they may have a photo or knowledge about the Māori value they can share with you and the class.

Another activity could be gardening and sharing the kai from the garden with others.  Maybe having a shared lunch and make soup with the vegetables the children have grown.

Going into the community and sharing some happiness with others. Maybe a trip to the old peoples home to sing some songs or take some baking to them.  I am sure that would bring a smile to their faces.

This is my Moko making a cake to share with the family, nice manaakitanga Moko.

What ways do you show manaakitanga in your classroom/school?  Please share by leaving a comment.